Tropical Storm Fay weakens as it passes near NYC

Tropical Storm Fay swirled to life off the North Carolina coast on Thursday, becoming the sixth-named storm for 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

Here are the latest updates:

Update 10:50 p.m. EDT July 10: Tropical Storm Fay barely hung onto tropical storm status as it moved into the New York Metropolitan area. According to the National Hurricane Center’s 11 p.m. EDT advisory, the center of the storm was located about 15 miles northwest of New York City.

The storm had sustained maximum winds of 40 mph and was moving rapidly to the north at 17 mph. According to the National Hurricane Center, the system is expected to become a post-tropical low pressure system on Saturday and dissipate by Sunday.

Update 8:31 p.m. EDT July 10: Tropical Storm Fay was weakening as the center of the storm moved across eastern New Jersey on Friday evening. The storm’s sustained winds dropped from 50 mph to 45 mph, and it has picked up speed as it is moving north at 14 mph.

Fay is expected to weaken to a tropical depression by Saturday morning and dissipate Sunday.

The National Hurricane Center will issue its next advisory at 11 p.m. EDT.



Update 4:55 p.m. EDT July 10: Tropical Storm Fay continued to dump heavy rains along the New Jersey coast as the Atlantic basin’s sixth-named storm of the 2020 hurricane season made landfall near Atlantic City.

The National Hurricane Center’s 5 p.m. EDT advisory put the center of Fay 10 miles north-northeast of Atlantic City, New Jersey and 90 miles south of New York City. Maximum sustained winds were 50 mph.

Heavy rains and gusty winds will move into northern New Jersey, southeastern New York and Long Island, the National Hurricane Center said. Fay is expected to weaken to a tropical depression by Saturday morning and dissipate Sunday.

The National Hurricane Center will issue an intermediate advisory at 8 p.m. EDT.

Update 2 p.m. EDT July 10: Officials with the National Weather Service’s National Hurricane Center said Friday afternoon that Tropical Storm Fay is expected to move nearer to the New Jersey coast as it continues to churn up the East Coast.

Forecasters expect the storm to make landfall sometime Friday night or Saturday morning, officials said.

As of 2 p.m. Friday, Tropical Storm Fay was about 140 miles south of New York City and 25 miles east-southeast of Cape May, New Jersey.

Update 1:15 p.m. EDT July 10: President Donald Trump on Friday postponed a planned rally in New Hampshire due to Tropical Storm Fay, WFXT reported.

The rally had been scheduled to take place Saturday at 8 p.m.

“With Tropical Storm Fay heading towards the Great State of New Hampshire this weekend, we are forced to reschedule our Portsmouth, New Hampshire Rally at the Portsmouth International Airport at Pease,” the president said in a tweet Friday afternoon.

>> Read more on Boston25News.com

Update 11:05 a.m. EDT July 10: Forecasters with the National Weather Service’s National Hurricane Center said Tropical Storm Faye strengthened slightly Friday morning as it continued to travel up the East Coast.

Maximum sustained winds were measured at 60 mph by 11 a.m. Friday, according to the National Weather Service’s National Hurricane Center, up 5 mph from the maximum reported three hours earlier. The storm was moving north at about 12 mph.

As of 11 a.m., forecasters said the storm was about 170 miles south of New York City and 40 miles south-southeast of Cape May, New Jersey.

Update 8:20 a.m. EDT July 10: The National Weather Service’s National Hurricane Center extended a tropical storm warning across the Delaware coastline Friday morning as Tropical Storm Fay continued to spin off the East Coast.

By 8 a.m. EDT, forecasters said the storm was about 55 miles south-southeast of Ocean City, Maryland, and 90 miles south of Cape May, New Jersey. It had maximum sustained winds measured at 50 mph as it traveled northward at 10 mph.

Update 5:18 a.m. EDT July 10: Tropical Storm Fay strengthened slightly as it headed northward, just offshore near the Delmarva Peninsula, the National Hurricane Center said early Friday.

In its 5 a.m. EDT advisory, the center said the storm, which had maximum sustained winds of 50 mph, was located about 65 miles south-southeast of Ocean City, Maryland, and 105 miles south of Cape May, New Jersey. It was moving northward at 10 mph.

Read more here.

Update 2:06 a.m. EDT July 10: Tropical Storm Fay continued to move northward, just to the east of the Mid-Atlantic states, the National Hurricane Center said early Friday.

In its 2 a.m. EDT advisory, the center said the storm, which had maximum sustained winds of 45 mph, was located about 105 miles south of Ocean City, Maryland, and 145 miles south of Cape May, New Jersey. It was moving northward at 8 mph.

Read more here.

Update 10:48 p.m. EDT July 9: Tropical Storm Fay continued to move away from the North Carolina coast and closer to the Mid-Atlantic and southern New England coasts, the National Hurricane Center said.

In its 11 p.m. EDT advisory, the National Hurricane Center said that Fay still had sustained winds of 45 mph at its center and was moving to the north at 8 mph. The eye of the storm was located about 85 miles north-northeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and 140 miles south of Ocean City, Maryland.

A tropical storm warning remained in effect from Cape May, New Jersey, to Watch Hill, Rhode Island, including the New York metropolitan area and the Long Island Sound.

The National Hurricane Center will issue an intermediate advisory at 2 a.m. EDT Friday.

Update 8:02 p.m. EDT July 9: Tropical Storm Fay continued to move northward at 8 mph with sustained winds of 45 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center’s 8 p.m. intermediate advisory.

At 8 p.m. EDT, the season’s sixth-named Atlantic tropical system was located about 70 miles northeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

A tropical storm warning was in effect for Cape May, New Jersey, to Watch Hill, Rhode Island, including the New York metropolitan area and the Long Island Sound.

The next advisory by the National Hurricane Center will be issued at 11 p.m. EDT.

Original report: According to the National Hurricane Center, Fay is expected to bring heavy rains and gusty winds to the parts of the Mid-Atlantic coast and southern New England.

Fay becomes the earliest sixth-named Atlantic storm in history, the National Hurricane Center said. The previous mark was held by Franklin, which formed on July 22, 2005.

The storm is located in the Atlantic Ocean just east of the Outer Banks. It was packing sustained winds of 45 mph as it was moving north at 7 mph, the National Hurricane Center said.

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